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The Two Contrary States of the Human Soul
Songs of Innocence and of Experience by William Blake
By Collin Boyle on Feb 10th, 2016
Symbolism
Grade Level
9-12
Essential Questions
What is poetry?
What strategies do you use to analyze poetry?
What devices do poets use?
What is the central idea/theme of a poem?
How does self-reflection create growth as an independent reader?
What are some different poetic forms and structures and how do they affect meaning?
Objectives
SWBAT understand the Romantic Philosophy of William Blake, analyzing poetic devices typical to the both William Blake and Romanticism in “The Chimney Sweeper (Innocence)” and “The Chimney Sweeper (Exp
SWBAT understand the Philosophy of William Blake, eventually writing one poem of “innocence” and one poem of “experience,” employing poetic devices typical to the both William Blake and Romanticism.
SWBAT provide constructive criticism and feedback to their fellow classmates.

Anticipatory set: Students will list words that come to mind when they hear the word “romantic.” I will dispel this notion of romance and offer new contextualization for Romanticism.

Mini lesson: Students will review elements of Romanticism (handout). Afterwards, students will accurately identify key components of Romanticism in “The Poison Tree” by William Blake. 


ACTIVITY 1

Anticipatory set: Students will respond to the following question: “What is the logical opposite of 
innocence?”

Mini Lesson: Students will review the Romantic Philosophy of William Blake, filling in a graphic organizer. 

Guided Practice: Students will analyze poetic devices typical to the both William Blake and Romanticism in “The Chimney Sweeper (Innocence)” and “The Chimney Sweeper (Experience)”. Students will accurately explain and identify elements of Romanticism and Blake’s philosophy, responding to short answer questions, interrogating the text to support their assertions using the "3C" method: claim, cite, connect.

ACTIVITY 2

Anticipatory Set: Students will list elements that should be included when writing like William Blake about innocence and experience. 

Set up of task:
Students will unpack the task sheet and rubric. 

Guided practice: Students will write one poem of “innocence” and one poem of “experience,” employing poetic devices typical to the both William Blake and Romanticism. 

ACTIVITY 3

Students will sit in a circle and share their poems.  After each students reads his or her poems (one for Innocence, one for Experience), the other students will provide constructive criticism to their fellow classmates using the praise and polish graphic organizer, annotations, and verbal feedback. 

Grade Level
9-12
Essential Questions
What is poetry?
What strategies do you use to analyze poetry?
What devices do poets use?
What is the central idea/theme of a poem?
How does self-reflection create growth as an independent reader?
What are some different poetic forms and structures and how do they affect meaning?
Objectives
SWBAT understand the Romantic Philosophy of William Blake, analyzing poetic devices typical to the both William Blake and Romanticism in “The Chimney Sweeper (Innocence)” and “The Chimney Sweeper (Exp
SWBAT understand the Philosophy of William Blake, eventually writing one poem of “innocence” and one poem of “experience,” employing poetic devices typical to the both William Blake and Romanticism.
SWBAT provide constructive criticism and feedback to their fellow classmates.